Weather in Exuma

Beach sceneThe weather in The Exumas

The trade winds that blow almost continually throughout The Islands of The Bahamas give the islands a warm, agreeable climate that varies little year-round. Winter temperatures range from 60°F at night to about 75°F during the afternoon in Nassau/PI. Temperatures tend to be similar all over The Bahamas, but are usually somewhat lower than Nassau/PI in the northerly islands during winter and about five degrees higher in the southern islands in summer months. The most refreshing time is between September and May, when the temperature averages 70-75°F. The rest of the year is a bit warmer with temperatures averaging between 80-90°F. Sea surface temperatures normally vary between 74°F in February and 83°F in August.

Humidity is fairly high, especially in the summer months. Winds are predominantly easterly throughout the year, but with a tendency to become northeasterly from October to April and southeasterly from May to September. Wind speeds are, on average below 10 knots; in winter months, periods of a day to two of north and northeast winds of about 25 knots may occur.

There are more than seven hours of bright sunshine per day in Nassau/PI on average, though periods of a day or two of cloudy weather can occur at any time of year. The length of day (the interval between sunrise and sunset) varies from 10 hours and 35 minutes in late December to 13 hours and 41 minutes in late June.

Rain showers occur any time of the year, but the rainy months are May to October. In Nassau/PI, rainfall averages two inches a month from November to April and six inches a month from May to October. In the northern islands, it is up to 20% more. The southern islands normally receive only half the Nassau/PI total. Rainfall is mainly in the form of heavy showers or thundershowers, which clear quickly.

This report copied from Bahamas.com

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Eddie Irvine comes to Exuma

Eddie Irvine

Eddie Irvine

Exuma welcomes famous race car driver Eddie Irvine to his new home of Exuma. Eddie has purchased what was Sam Greys yacht club and has spent the last year repairing and updating the marina, the service station and the restaurant. Now known as the Exuma Yacht Club, the bar has become a popular haunt for the locals and visitors alike.

Eddie, a native of Northern Island, inherited his love of cars from his father, who taught him not only to drive at a very young age, but also how to strip and rebuild an engine.  Eddie started racing in his teens and over the years worked his way from local events to Formula 3 and eventually to Formula 1 Grand Prix cars.  Ferrari recognized his talent and signed him as number 2 driver, number 1 being the many times world champion Michael Shumacher. So Eddie joined the jet set and became an international star. Eddie drove in 148 Grand Prix around the world.

Eddie invested his money wisely and retired from racing a multi-millionaire.

Now he owns an island close to Exuma and spends his time on his new home and renovating the marina and restaurant. Stop in at Exuma Yacht Club and you may find Eddie, and welcome him to Exuma.

 

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Guest Review 37

“Harbour View Villa–perfect!”

We had the pleasure of staying with Don and Gail for 10 nights in May. We have traveled a bit, and have to say, that this was an absolutely fantastic vacation! The accommodation’s were perfect and the hosts even better! They were there to answer questions we had, yet at the same time respected our privacy. The bed was more comfortable than what I sleep on at home. I actually wrote down the name in hopes in find it here. The air conditioning was cool, the water in the shower hot. The view from the room is breathtaking. Like a postcard. We ate breakfast and lunch in, and went out to dinner nightly. I highly recommend a rental car for eating and getting around to the various beaches on the island. Don has made this awesome book that lists restaurants and beaches and gives you how many kilometers away they are if you zero out trip meter in your car. It was really handy because a lot of the beaches don’t have signs on the road. We used the complimentary kayak and paddled our way across to Moriah Harbor Cay. We spent 5 of our 10 days there. Unbelievably perfect. We had the whole island to ourselves every day we were there. We went to every beach on it. We found tons of sand dollars and various shells. My husband fished and caught sharks(little ones),barracuda, and other fish I have no idea what they were. We saw a lot of bone fish but couldn’t get one. The beaches we had to drive to were equally as beautiful and never any people. The most crowded beach we went to had 2 other couples on it. If you are looking for a totally laid back vacation, gorgeous beaches, and no people, then Don and Gail’s Harbour View Villa is for you. Wonderful people in a wonderful place! I highly recommend it!

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Bathynomus, A creature from the deep

Bathynomus, not going to win any beauty contest, no its not a giant bed bug. In fact this strange creature lives at great depths, like 8,500 ft down in the marine trench known as the Exuma Deep. When scientists sent a remote camera down to photograph deep sea creatures. after getting some great shots their screens went blank. So pull up the camera and find that something has eaten through the cables.

After repairs the camera was again lowered and started to record until suddenly.. boof.. breakdown. Again the cables had been eaten. The culprit turned out to be The Bathynomus.

The good news is they taste like lobster.  How big are they?  around Two and half pounds!!

Bathynomus

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Dr Will Macklin

BNT teams up to asses seabirds in the Southern Bahamas. Recently the Society for the Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds, Biodiversity Research Institute and the Bahamas National Trust came together in a major effort to assess the seabirds of the Cay Sal Bank. The Cay Sal Bank, a remote and rarely visited island group in the south-western corner of The Bahamas archipelago, is one of the largest atolls in the world. Pictured is Dr. Will Macin counting seabirds on a cay, all work was done on a volunteer basis.

Recently the Society for the Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds, Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) and the Bahamas National Trust (BNT) came together in a major effort to assess the seabirds of the Cay Sal Bank.

The Cay Sal Bank, a remote and rarely visited island group in the southwestern corner of the Bahamas archipelago, is one of the largest atolls in the world. Human inhabitants have established permanent settlements on only two of the hundreds of cays and rocks on the Bank. Biodiversity Research Institute( BRI) instituted a special Science Expedition from May 26th – June 1, 2012 this year to allow scientists and volunteers to estimate the number of breeding seabirds on the Cay Sal Bank.


Assessment of Seabirds in the southern Bahamas The expedition to asses seabirds, visited three major island groups—Cotton and Anguilla Cays in the southeast corner of the Bank, the Double-Headed Shot Cays on the western side, and the Elbow Cays in the southwestern corner. At each stop, the group divided into teams, each led by an experienced field biologist. Teams set up permanent census plots to document the populations and enable monitoring of the health of the populations with future surveys. All of the fieldwork was voluntary. Pictured are Jeff Gerbracht, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ann Sutton, SCSCB and Lisa Sorenson, SCSCB search for wetland birds on Cotton Cay.

The Seabirds of the Cay Sal Bank Expedition was BRI’s inaugural Ecotour BRI’s unique new Ecotour program will allow participants to join research biologists on scientific expeditions in locales around the world. Groups will include a mix of experienced wildlife biologists and interested participants

Participants lived aboard the Sea Explorer, a 65-foot sailboat, chartered by Blackbeard’s Cruises, that accommodated 18 passengers in rustic, bunk-style sleep quarters. The ship’s crew provided three meals a day plus beverages.

Working alongside Biodiversity Research Institutes wildlife biologists and ornithologists, as well as guest biologists and conservation experts, the expedition participants make important contributions to science while exploring breathtakingly beautiful islands.

Sooty Tern

Caribbean Seabirds on Cay Sal Bank Thousands of seabirds nest on the Cay Sal Bank; the area is designated as an Important Bird Area by the Bahamas National Trust and Birdlife International. The seabird colonies here have never been properly documented, however they include significant portions of the region’s seabird populations. As environmentalist strive to halt the decline of seabirds in the Caribbean, it is critical for them to know the size and status of these large populations. Pictured is a Sooty Tern on Cay Sal Bank.

Caribbean Seabirds

Thousands of seabirds nest on the Cay Sal Bank; the area is designated as an Important Bird Area by the Bahamas National Trust and Birdlife International The seabird colonies here have never been properly documented, however they include significant portions of the region’s seabird populations. As we strive to halt the decline of seabirds in the Caribbean, it is critical for us to know the size and status of these large populations.

The goal of the expedition was to locate and carefully estimate current numbers of breeding seabirds, including: Audubon’s Shearwaters, Brown Boobies, Sooty Terns, Bridled Terns, Brown Noddies, Least Terns, Roseate Terns, Royal Terns, and Sandwich Terns.
Sea Explorer is home for Volunteer participants. Watching for Seabirds, participants assess the seabirds of the Cay Sal Bank. Observers lived aboard the Sea Explorer, a 65-foot sailboat, chartered by Blackbeard’s Cruises, that accommodated 18 passengers in rustic, bunk-style sleep quarters.

The expedition, visited three major island groups—Cotton and Anguilla Cays in the southeast corner of the Bank, the Double-Headed Shot Cays on the western side, and the Elbow Cays in the southwestern corner. At each stop, the group divided into teams, each led by an experienced field biologist. Teams set up permanent census plots to document the populations and enable monitoring of the health of the populations with future surveys. All of the fieldwork was voluntary.

The expedition was led by:

William A. Mackin, Ph.D., who specializes in the conservation of Caribbean seabirds. He earned his doctorate (UNC-Chapel Hill) studying the behavior of Audubon’s Shearwaters and other seabirds in the Exuma Cays. In 2010, he worked in The Bahamas to determine if oil from the Gulf of Mexico was polluting the Cay Sal Bank; that experience inspired him to promote ecotourism to this amazing island group. For more information on seabirds in the Caribbean visit: http://wicbirds.net/

Lisa F. Eggert, M.S. is the director of BRI’s coastal bird program and a Ph.D. candidate at Clemson University. Since 2010, Lisa has been leading studies of health and movement of seabirds affected by the DeepWater Horizon oil spill. She and her Ph.D. advisor, Dr. Patrick Jodice, have partnered with Dr. Mackin to track the movements and health of seabird populations in the Bahamas since 2008.

Also participating in the expedition were BNT Science Officer Predensa Moore and BNT Warden (Grand Bahama) David Cleare. Volunteer biologists and conservation professionals included Lisa Sorenson PhD and Ann Sutton PhD of the Society for the Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds, Michael Sorenson PhD, Boston University, and Jeff Gerbacht Cornell Lab Ornithology.

Copied from The Bahamas Weekly written by the Bahamas National Trust

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“Exuma” trailer

Check out this fabulous video made by Colin Ruggiero. The best I have seen of the island of Great Exuma in The Bahamas.

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HarborTown Flyfishing at Harbour View Exuma


Video taken by Angela at HarborTown Fly Fishing while staying at our home in Hartswell
For more information visit their website at: www.harbortownflyfishing.com

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Fly fishing in Bahamas

Bonefish at Harbour View Exuma

Bonefishing off Harbour View Exuma

 

 

The best way to get good at fly fishing for bonefish is to go where you get lots of opportunities.

In other words, bring your fly rod to the Bahamas.

Lots of fish and not a lot of fishing pressure add up to lots of fun, especially for novice fly rodders and those who have been frustrated by the educated bonefish in Biscayne Bay and the Florida Keys.

Despite having plenty of fish, the bountiful Bahamian flats have relatively few anglers.

Most all of the islands in the Bahamas have flats with bonefish, and anglers can choose where to fish based on the other things they or their family members like to do. The bahamas.com website has helpful information on a variety of activities and places to stay.

Probably the most important consideration is having a good guide. During a cruise several years ago, I was wading a flat when the guide took off with the bait to catch his own bonefish, leaving me with a bait-less hook as a school of fish swam in front of me. Then there was the Bimini guide who knew of only two places to catch bonefish. Another guide was already fishing each spot, so we were out of luck.

Copied from Sun Sentinal

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Harbortown Flyfishing

See the video from our friends at Harbortown Flyfishing who stayed with us last month. Thank you guys, we hope to see you again.   www.harbortownflyfishing.com

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Exuma Fishing Forecast for April

The offshore fishing so far this year has been good both in quantity and size. So be prepared for a 100lb Wahoo. In addition there have been more reports of sailfish caught offshore this year.  Our offshore fishing guru, Doug Rowe is keeping a log of sailfish caught so I will e mail him for details.

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